Recently my blog followers crossed the 100 mark, and although it was a small milestone in the scheme of things, it was nevertheless one I thought worth celebrating.  I remember the day I had started my blog – 100 followers seemed like a lofty goal. And now I had reached it.

Celebrating my 100th follower at The Leader's Digest

I had a celebratory glass of champagne with my communications manager Amy, and in addition to discussing the blogging journey over the last seven months, we toasted to our success.

Not only was it great fun, it was also invigorating, and inspired me to continue the journey with a newly founded sense of direction, commitment and enthusiasm.

It reminded me that as leaders, it can be all too easy to forget to celebrate the small successes along the way.  We can become so caught up in the endless cycle of improvement, focussing on what is wrong, to the point where we can fail to celebrate what we are doing right.

I’m not suggesting complacency or adopting a ‘Pollyanna mindset’, however striking a balance between continuous  improvement and celebrating milestones is instrumental to a company’s success.

Designating celebration points for reaching milestones or when setting goals will keep your team motivated and re-engage those that need inspiration or incentive.

Reward hard work, good effort and positive choices.

Acknowledging results can provide the necessary fuel we need for the next step in our journey towards achieving our organisational vision.

Climbing - The Leader's Digest by Suzi McAlpine

There are valleys between each mountaintop. We must re-energize for continued effective climbing.

Failure to celebrate can leave our teams feeling depleted and demotivated.  As leaders we want our teams to bring their best selves to their work – noticing what they are doing well is a simple way of feeding this.

As the wise Tom Peters once said; “Celebrate what you want to see more of.”

Ask yourself this – have you taken time to appreciate, reflect and celebrate your team’s accomplishments and even in a quiet moment, those of your own?